State Water Board Rescinds Mandatory Conservation Standards; Reporting Requirements and Prohibition on Water Waste Remain

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RELEASE DATE:  Monday, May 1, 2017                     
 
RUN THROUGH DATE:  Friday, May 19, 2017
 
FROM:  McKinleyville Community Services District
                                Greg Orsini, General Manager
                                (707) 839-3251
 
Subject:  State Water Board Rescinds Mandatory Conservation Standards; Reporting Requirements and Prohibition on Water Waste Remain
 
McKinleyville, CA –  With Governor Brown’s announcement that the drought state of emergency has ended, prohibitions including outdoor watering during a rain event or 48 hours after; watering down a sidewalk with a hose instead of using a broom or a brush, or overwatering a landscape to where water is running off onto the sidewalk or into the gutter still remain in effect.
 
On Wednesday, April 26, 2017, the State Water Resources Control Board rescinded the water supply “stress test” requirements and remaining mandatory conservation standards for urban water suppliers while keeping in place the water use reporting requirements and prohibitions against wasteful practices.
 
This action was in response to Governor Brown’s Executive Order in early April ending the drought state of emergency and transitioning to a permanent framework for making water conservation a California way of life.
 
Long-term conservation framework, includes recommendations to establish permanent water conservation standards and improved agricultural and urban water management planning to better prepare for more frequent and severe droughts due to climate change. As part of the framework, the Governor released proposed legislation to establish long-term water conservation measures and improved planning for more frequent and severe droughts. Among other things the proposed legislation:
•Requires the State Water Board, in consultation with the Department of Water Resources (DWR), to set long-term urban water use efficiency standards by May 20, 2021;
• Includes a robust public participation process to provide the State Water Board and DWR with critical input from local agencies, tribal governments, nongovernmental organizations, the business sector, academics, and others; 
• Requires urban water suppliers to plan for droughts lasting five or more years; and
• Establishes new drought planning and water efficiency reporting requirements for agricultural water suppliers.